Basic Couch Cushion

Self-made cushions make any couch or bed prettier and in this beginner’s version, they are surprisingly easy to make. Depending on the size, though, they can take a longer time to crochet than other, smaller projects. Below you will find the pattern for a couch cushion I already made a while back. I found it fun and relaxing to crochet in the evenings while watching TV because of the pretty, yet simple, pattern and wanted to share it with you.

The cushion.

The Set-Up

  • crochet terminology: American
  • Yarn:
    • a mix of wool and poly-amid; fairly thin (4 threads), hence the small hook
    • Color 1: multi-color thread in red tones
    • Color 2: light brown
  • Hook: 2.5 mm
  • Other material: cotton wadding
  • Basic pattern:
    • main stitch: single crochet (sc), chain stitch (ch)
    • crochet in rows
    • begin each new row with 1 chain stitch

Note: You can choose any yarn you like (just make sure it feels nice to the touch). For the appropriate hook size, check the manufacturer’s recommendation on the sleeve and, if necessary, do a stitch swatch.

Have fun and let me know in the comments below or on Instagram and Twitter how your cushion turned out. I would love to hear from you!

The colorful yarn will contrast nicely with the more subdued brown.

Crocheting the Pillow Surfaces

  • In Color 1, loosely crochet as many ch as you need. This will be the width of the cushion. The final number of chains must be even (i.e. dividable by 2).
  • Chain an additional t-ch.
  • Row 1: Crochet into the second stitch from the hook (skip the t-ch). Crochet *1 sc, 2 ch, and 1 sc into the ch. Skip a ch.* Repeat from * to * until the end of the row.
  • Row 2: Chain 1 t-ch. Crochet into the 2-ch spaces of the previous row. Into the 2-ch space, crochet *1 sc, 2 ch, and 1 sc.* Repeat from * to * until the end of the row.
  • Repeat Row 2 until you have reached the desired height of the pillow.
  • In Color 2, begin next row with a t-ch, then keep following the instructions for Row 2.
  • Continue crocheting Row 2 in Color 2 until you have the same number of rows as in Color 1. Fasten off and weave in ends.

Finishing the Pillow

  • Fold your piece so that you have the front and the back of the cushion on top of each other. Make sure that the ends of the rows align perfectly.
  • Tie a slip knot onto your hook to start crocheting the two parts of the cushion together. Make sure to leave a long enough end that you can comfortably weave in later.
  • Start in one corner and crochet the two halves together using sc. Crochet 3 sc into the corners.
  • Once you have only a little part left to crochet, start filling the cushion with cotton wadding. Make sure not to use too little wadding since it will compress after a while, especially if you use the cushion regularly.
  • Finish crocheting the last part, fasten off, and weave in your ends.

Easy Loop in Rows

My husband wanted a small loop to wear throughout the day when the weather is a bit chilly outside. I am a big fan of patterns and this wavy design works great in a circle because it is potentially endless.

The finished loop.

The Set-Up

  • crochet terminology: American
  • Yarn:
    • Any warm and soft yarn will do, but I used a basic polyester yarn.
    • You need two contrasting colors.
    • Color 1: yellow
    • Color 2: blue
  • Hook: 5 mm, 6 mm
  • Other material: sowing needle
  • Basic pattern:
    • stitches: chain stitches (ch), single crochets (sc), half double crochets (hdc), double crochet (dc), treble crochets (tc)
    • crochet in rows

Note: You can choose any yarn you like (just make sure it feels nice to the touch). For the appropriate hook size, check the manufacturer’s recommendation on the sleeve and, if necessary, do a stitch swatch.

Crochet pieces tend to widen as they grow in length. When the initial starting row of chain stitches is not loose enough, this can lead to a rather stiff and stretched-out foundation while the top parts are soft and loose. In order to avoid this from happening when you crochet this loop, use a hook one full size bigger than you plan to use for the actual loop. This way, the first row of chain stitches is a bit bigger than you need and are flexible when the piece starts to stretch out as you crochet row after row.

Crocheting the Loop

  • In Color 1, loosely crochet as many ch as you need. This will be the width of the loop. The final number of chains must be dividable by 6.
  • Row 1 (Color 1 / Yellow): Chain 1 t-ch and crochet 1 sc into each ch.
  • Row 2 (Color 1 / Yellow): Chain 1 t-ch, *1 sc, 1 hdc, 1 dc, 1 tc, 1 dc, 1 hdc.* Repeat from * to * until the end of the row. Fasten off the yarn for Color 1 and switch to Color 2.
  • Row 3 (Color 2 / Blue): Chain 4 t-ch (counts as 1 tc), 1 dc into the hdc of the previous row, 1 hdc, 1 sc, 1 hdc, 1 dc, 1 tc. Then continue by chaining *1 tc, 1 dc, 1 hdc, 1 sc, 1 hdc, 1 dc, and 1 tc,* repeating from * to * until the end of the row. Fasten off the yarn for color 2 and switch to color 1.

Note: For the pattern to unfold its full effect, it is important that each row is absolutely regular. Make sure that you crochet the tc of Row 3 always into the sc of Row 2. The idea is that the “biggest” stitch of the pattern (i.e. the tc) is always crocheted into the “smallest” stitch (i.e. the sc). In effect, you stack 1 tc in color 2 onto 1 sc in color 1 and so on.

  • Continue by crocheting Row 2 and Row 3 in turns until you have reached the desired height of your loop. Finish the last row in Color 1.
  • In Color 1, crochet a hdc into each ch of the previous row. Fasten off the yarn.

Finishing the Loop

  • Align the ends of the shawl.
  • Take a sowing needle and sow the ends together to create a loop. Weave in the ends.
  • I used the ends of the yarn created when changing colors and used it to connect the respective rows. This way, I could hide the seam better by not breaking the color pattern.

Have fun and let me know in the comments below or on Instagram and Twitter how you like the design.

Easy and Fun – Round Kitchen Sponges

Sponges are one of those essential items found in every household – and now you can crochet your own! At this point, there are many different types of yarn available on the market and you can pick from a wide variety of material. For the sponges described in the patterns below, I chose “Creative Bubble” by Rico Design. It is made from polyester and can be washed at 60° C, meaning that you can use your sponge many times. This is a nice alternative to the single use sponges you can buy in stores. Because of their bright and happy colors, these little helpers look great in any kitchen. Make them for yourself and/or give them as little gifts to your friends and family.

(Unpaid and unsolicited advertisement because of brand mention.)

The Set-Up

  • crochet terminology: American
  • Yarn: Rico Design, Creative Bubble
    • Since the yarn is so fluffy, we don’t have to worry so much about “hiding” the chain stitches at the beginning of each round as well as the sponge developing “corners” because we are stacking increases on top of one another.
  • Hook: 4.5 mm
  • Other material: sowing needle
  • Basic stitch: double crochets (dc)
    • crochet in rounds
    • begin each round with 3 chain stitches (or 2, if you prefer)
    • close each round with a slip stitch into the second (or third) chain stitch (i.e. the “top” of the first double crochet)

Crocheting a Big Sponge (Diameter ca. 14 cm)

  • Make a magic ring and crochet 3 ch (counts as 1 dc) and 9 dc. Close the circle with a ss into the third ch (i.e. the “top” of the first dc). (= 10 dc)
  • Round 1: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), increase every dc. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 20 dc)
  • Round 2: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), increase every second dc. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 30 dc)
  • Round 3: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), increase every third dc. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 40 dc)
  • Round 4: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), increase every fourth dc. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 50 dc)
  • Round 5: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), crochet a dc into each dc (no increases). Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 50 dc)
  • Round 6: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), crochet a dc into each dc (no increases). Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 50 dc)
  • Round 7: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), dc2tog every fourth and fifth stitch. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 40 dc)
  • Round 8: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), dc2tog every third and fourth stitch. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 30 dc)
  • Round 9: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), dc2tog every second and third stitch. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 20 dc)
  • Round 10: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), dc2tog every stitch. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 10 dc)
  • Round 11: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), dc2tog every stitch. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 5 dc)
  • 1 ss in the second and fourth stitch, fasten off, and weave in the end.
The big sponge.

Crocheting a Medium-Sized Sponge (Diameter ca. 11 cm)

  • Make a magic ring and crochet 3 ch (counts as 1 dc) and 9 dc. Close the circle with a ss into the third ch (i.e. the “top” of the first dc). (= 10 dc)
  • Round 1: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), increase every dc. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 20 dc)
  • Round 2: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), increase every second dc. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 30 dc)
  • Round 3: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), increase every third dc. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 40 dc)
  • Round 4: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), crochet a dc into each dc (no increases). Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 40 dc)
  • Round 5: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), crochet a dc into each dc (no increases). Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 40 dc)
  • Round 6: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), dc2tog every third and fourth stitch. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 30 dc)
  • Round 7: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), dc2tog every second and third stitch. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 20 dc)
  • Round 8: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), dc2tog every stitch. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 10 dc)
  • Round 9: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), dc2tog every stitch. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 5 dc)
  • 1 ss in the second and fourth stitch, fasten off, and weave in the end.

Crocheting a Small Sponge (Diameter ca. 8 cm)

  • Make a magic ring and crochet 3 ch (counts as 1 dc) and 9 dc. Close the circle with a ss into the third ch (i.e. the “top” of the first dc). (= 10 dc)
  • Round 1: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), increase every dc. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 20 dc)
  • Round 2: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), increase every second dc. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 30 dc)
  • Round 3: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), crochet a dc into each dc (no increases). Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 30 dc)
  • Round 4: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), crochet a dc into each dc (no increases). Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 30 dc)
  • Round 5: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), dc2tog every second and third stitch. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 20 dc)
  • Round 6: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), dc2tog every stitch. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 10 dc)
  • Round 7: Chain 3 (counts as 1 dc), dc2tog every stitch. Close the circle with a ss into the first dc. (= 5 dc)
  • 1 ss in the second and fourth stitch, fasten off, and weave in the end.
The small sponge.

Individualizing Your Sponges

As you crochet your sponge, you can get creative with the color scheme and individualize your sponge. One way to do that is by alternating the colors in each round. Another possibility is to sow on a smiley face onto the sponge in the end. A third option is to sow a slogan or funny word onto the sponge; this will work best on the big sponge because you have more surface.

Have fun and let me know in the comments below or on Instagram and Twitter what kind of sponges you made.

Crochet Terminology

As you look through my posts about crochet patterns and projects, a word on terminology is in order. As you may know, the terms for stitches used in the UK differ somewhat from those used in the US, so I have prepared the chart below. The whole matter is somewhat complicated because both rely on the same terms, yet mean different types of stitches. So it is important to be attentive. I have decided to use the American terms in my blog posts, simply because those were the first ones I came across when I started reading manuals in English. Also, I write and speak American English and it makes more sense to me to stick to the American crochet terminology for the sake of coherence. To clarify things, I will also always specify in each blog post which set of terms I am using.

Crochet Terminology in Different Countries

GermanAmericanBritish
Luftmasche
(Lm)
chain stitch
(ch)
chain stitch
(ch)
Wendeluftmasche
(WLm)
turning chain
(t-ch)
turning chain
(t-ch)
Kettmasche
(Km)
slip stitch
(ss, sl st)
slip stitch
(ss, sl st)
feste Masche
(fM)
single crochet
(sc)
double crochet
(dc)
halbes Stäbchen
(hStb)
half double crochet
(hdc)
half treble crochet
(htc)
Stäbchen
(Stb)
double crochet
(dc)
treble crochet
(tr)
Doppelstäbchen
(2erStb)
treble crochet
(tr)
double treble crochet
(dtr)
Dreifachstäbchen
(3erStb)
double treble crochet
(dtr)
triple treble crochet
(ttr)
Fadenringmagic ring,
magic circle
magic ring,
magic circle
2 Stäbchen
zusammen abmaschen
(2 Stb zus abm)
double crochet
2 stitches together
(dc2tog)
treble crochet
2 stitches together
(tr2tog)
2-Luftmaschen-Kette
(2-Lm-Kette)
2-chain space
(2-ch space)
2-chain space
(2-ch space)
Short overview of essential crochet terminology

Turning Chains

American Terms“Traditional” Number of
Turning Chains
(t-ch)
Alternative Number of
Turning Chains
(t-ch)
single crochet11
half double crochet21
double crochet32
treble crochet43
double treble crochet54
The appropriate number of t-ch depends on your individual crochet style, the kind of project your are crocheting, and the yarn type.

“Traditional” crochet theory recommends using 3 chain stitches when choosing double crochets, but this is not a fixed rule at all. I often actually use only two chain stitches because it creates a more even pattern with less gaps. So you see, how many chain stitches you use also depends on your individual crochet style as well as the type of yarn you are using. Hence, in some patterns I only use two chain stitches and in others I use three – in the end, however, it is your choice whether you want to use two or three chain stitches when you crochet your project.

Whatever you do, make sure to have fun! There is usually more than one “correct” way to achieve the look you are going for. 🙂